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Anatomy of a Nor'easter

Anatomy of a Nor’easter

A meteorological and personal recap of the winter storm that left the Northeast buried in two to three feet of snow between February 8th and 9th.

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Snowflake Perfection

Snowflake Perfection

We often think of snowflakes in terms of the perfect, crystal forms featured on holiday cards and sweaters, but these perfect-looking snowflakes are actually very rare.

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Humongous Fungus!

Humongous Fungus!

In a forested area along the western edge of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula lurks a very large fungus. It doesn’t inspire awe in the way that a giant redwood or blue whale might, it isn’t grand, and it isn’t majestic, but this prodigious fungus is among the largest living things in the world.

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Honey Bees, Whiskey, and Juicy Fruit Gum

Honey Bees, Whiskey, and Juicy Fruit Gum

For a blog called Smells Like Science, you might have noticed that I haven’t written much about smelly science. That all changes here as I get to the bottom of the “Juicy Fruit: which fruit does it taste like?” debate. Plus, what do Juicy Fruit Gum and honey bees have in common?

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Photographic Memory

Photographic Memory

How does the quality of photographs influence our relationship with the past? Plus photographs of the final years of the Russian Empire in vivid color.

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Cities Before They Were Cities

Cities Before They Were Cities

Just in time for Earth Day, what did San Francisco, New York, and Boston look like before they were cities?

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Apple Pie, Hold the Apples

Apple Pie, Hold the Apples

There aren’t many foods that are as closely tied to American identity as apple pie. In fact, Americans love apple pie so much that, at times, we’ve felt compelled to make it even when we don’t have any apples. I’ve heard about a recipe for apple-less apple pie from a number of people over the years, but I’ve never talked to anyone who’s actually eaten it. So this past weekend, I decided to give it a try.

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Part 2: The Vasa Resurrected

Part 2: The Vasa Resurrected

The Vasa is a massive Swedish warship that sank during its maiden voyage in 1628. The entire ship is now on display at a museum in Stockholm. How did it get there? How was a nearly 400-year-old shipwreck preserved?

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Part 1: The Vasa Lost and Found

Part 1: The Vasa Lost and Found

A 17th century Swedish warship sinks less than a mile into its maiden voyage and is lost for over three hundred years.

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A True Tale of Maritime Loss and Redemption in Two Parts

A True Tale of Maritime Loss and Redemption in Two Parts

When two of my friends returned from a late-summer vacation in Stockholm with an idea for a blog post about a 17th century Swedish shipwreck I jumped at the idea. It’s a story, spanning four centuries, that has everything: tragedy, underwater archaeology, perseverance, cultural heritage, 17th century Swedish politics.

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